Monday, May 9, 2011

Isabelle de Borchgrave, an inspiration

Isabelle de Borchgrave 
Isabelle de Borchgrave has joined the ranks of Frida Kahlo, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Nick Bantock.  I just found another hero.  Her exhibition, Pulp Fashion, at the Legion of Honor is stunning.

She creates full scale and full detail historic costumes out of paper.  100% paper.  She paints large sheets, hand prints designs, and recreates patterns to achieve breathtaking interpretations of the entire ensembles.  Lace, ribbons, feathers, pearls, chains, all the nuances out of just paper.  How can paper emulate silk?  Borchgrave will show you.
The exhibit does not take up too many rooms, but each room is a treasure to occupy the eyes for hours.  She even created a tent out of paper to set the some of the costumes in context.
While I was there I was overcome with the urge to just sit down on the floor and cry.  I wanted so desperately to be in the middle of creating one of those costumes right then and there.  It was deep seeded desire that made me ache.  I hope one day I can create something that draws that sort of response from myself. So I went home and went straight to the studio to start dressing my next bedouin in paper.

3 comments:

Briskin, Cross & Sanford, LLC said...

That's pretty awesome! :)

taska said...

I would love to tour her studio

Anami said...

I hope your bedouin is going well.

Being overcome with awe and ache at another's creative brilliance and comparing that with your own hope for your art makes me think of a Martha Graham quote. It's a quote I find inspirational. :)

'There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all of time, this expression is unique. And if you block it, it will never exist through any other medium and it will be lost. The world will not have it. It is not your business to determine how good it is nor how valuable nor how it compares with other expressions. It is your business to keep it yours clearly and directly, to keep the channel open. You do not even have to believe in yourself or your work. You have to keep yourself open and aware to the urges that motivate you. Keep the channel open. ... No artist is pleased. [There is] no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others.'